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  • What did we do before Crock-Pots?
    Life was never the same after I discovered my first crock-pot. Over the years I have had many crock-pots… all shapes, sizes, colors, and brand names. I think I like the first one that I got the very best of all, it was a West Bend and it was the kind that had a pot [...] The post What did we do before Crock-Pots? appeared first on You Can Eat My DIRT. […]
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Posts Tagged ‘EarthWorksHealth’

postheadericon DE Pro Pet Powder

Earth Works Health announces… “Pro Pet Powder” This is a Diatomaceous Earth Product with lots of goodies added!! While still 90% Food Grade Diatomaceous Earth, the other 10% is packed with several nutrients to enhance the health of your dog or cat. We have added the Probiotic Lactobacillus Acidophilus, Enzymes, Yeast Culture, Multi-Vitamins and Chelated Trace Minerals. There are approximately 120 tablespoons in this 1 pound container, so even if you have a large dog and are using a tablespoon a day, this is a 4 month supply. If feeding to a cat or small dog, this is up to a years supply! Scoop is included in package.
NOT FOR SALE IN THE STATE OF TEXAS!

postheadericon Who Are You Sleeping With?

Who are you sleeping with….? You might be surprised what all that itching that your doing is really from. It may be bedbugs.

Beg bugs are a growing concern everywhere. Here is a very short video about these nasty YUCKY bugs.

Food Grade Diatomaceous Earth (DE) Kills bed bugs without using heat or chemicals.
DE kills bedbugs by dehydrating them.

PS.. I love this wonderful all natural product. I use it for many things besides keeping fleas and ticks off my animals.
I eat it for my good health TOO.

Please Like Us on Facebook and keep up with our posts about one of Mother Natures Miracles.

postheadericon Walts Real Flea Circus

I have heard talk of a flea circus, though I must admit I have never seen one.. nor have I ever seen one advertized to attend. I found the next best thing. Here is a video of Walt’s Real Flea Circus.

I hate these tiny crawly bugs that use to cause havoc on my dogs and cats. But this flea circus really is amazing.

Thanks goodness for Diatomaceous Earth… Walt wouldn’t want to get it to close to his circus

postheadericon Parasites And Our Pets

Here is an interesting article about parasites and our pets. I have pasted the entire article here. I found the article here resourcesforlife.net/article.asp?article=219   This post talks about our pets having parasites. I use diatomaceous earth to keep the parasites on my pets under control. I am sure you will find this an interesting read.

We adore our pets.  In return they accept and love us for who we are, even if we’ve had a bad day at the office, not put on the right eyeliner, are hours late to feed them or are distracted with other thoughts when they want our attention.

Humans are exceptionally good at looking after their pets when there’s something wrong with them.   Or at least we think we are.  The trouble is that, even with the animals best interests at heart, pet owners too often rush to the vet for minor ailments and the resultant treatment could be the proverbial sledgehammer cracking a nut.  In most cases preventive treatment would considerably cut down on a number of unnecessary health scares every year.

The first thing you need to have a look at is the food you are giving your pet, because many pet foods manufacturers use unpardonable ingredients as filler.  Most household cats are fed on only dried pellets but when did you last see cats in the wild foraging for dried foods?

Parasites in animals

All animals have  internal and external parasites. Internal parasites live in the intestines, bloodstream, joints muscle tissue and the brain. External parasites such as fleas, ticks, mites and lice live on or just under the skin. Internal parasites include intestinal worms as well as protozoa such as giardia, often ingested from contaminated water supplies. All parasites can cause discomfort, illness and even death.

The incidence of parasites in animals is high although it depends on the animal. Domestic pets that forage for mice, birds and other such wildlife will ingest parasites from their prey.  The danger is that these parasites can be passed on to their owners in a variety of ways. How many children play in sandpits where dogs or cats have left their calling card?  Or how many people are repeatedly licked on the face by a friendly pet?  How many people don’t scrub their fingernails before eating?

How can a parasite possibly live inside your body?  The answer is simple. The purpose of a parasite is to not make itself known. Parasites are very adept at evading a response from the immune system. They live undetected because once they are revealed, something will be done to eliminate them.  Parasites have an innate ability to survive and reproduce.  This is the purpose of any organism on this planet. Although this may sound simplistic it can make life for humans very difficult.

If you know how to recognize and interpret the symptoms, the presence of a parasite can be established easily. In humans this can manifest as low energy levels, health conditions, skin rashes, pains, frequent colds, flu and constipation.  The list goes on and on. The key is to question these symptoms rather than think such afflictions are commonplace.

In his book, “Animals Parasitic in Man.” by Geoffrey Lapage, states: “There is no part of the human body, nor indeed, any part of the bodies of the hosts of parasitic animals in general, which is not visited by some kind of parasitic animal at some time or another, during their life histories.” In short parasites can migrate to any part of your body. No organ is immune from their infestation.

Parasites that regularly affect animals include microscopic protozoans, a host of migratory worms and arthropod parasites such as mites, ticks, lice, fleas and even some spiders.

Hookworm infection occurs when larvae in the soil penetrate the pet’s skin, move into the bloodstream, and eventually travel to the intestine. Adult worms mature in the wall of the intestine and feed on blood from the intestinal lining, sometimes causing serious anemia.

Roundworm infections of dogs and cats occur when microscopic worm eggs present in the soil are eaten. The eggs develop through larval stages in the gut; some larvae penetrate the intestinal wall, migrate to the lungs and are coughed up then re-swallowed, after which they re-enter the small intestine where they mature into adult worms. Roundworms compete with your pet for food, causing malnutrition.

Roundworm enter their host by ingestion; hookworm by active penetration of the skin; the heartworm enters its dog host with the help of a mosquito vector. Microscopic larvae enter the blood along with mosquito saliva when an infected mosquito bites a dog. The larvae uses the blood stream to carry it right into to the heart where it matures, infesting the heart’s chambers and lodging in the veins that enter the heart.

National Geographic: October 1997   “Parasites: looking For a Free Lunch”
“Some parasites can change the habits of animals, prodding them to adjust their usual behaviour.  Horses of the Camargue in southern France leave their creekside habitat for a higher ground during hours of peak horsefly activity.  Field crickets in Hawaii adjust the timing of their mating songs to avoid attack by parasitic flies, says Marlene Zuk, a biologist at the University of California, Riverside.  Even the stripes of a zebra may be an adaptation for evading the blood-sucking tsetse flies of sub-Saharan Africa.  Tsetse’s often carry parasites called trypanosomes, microscopic protozoans that cause sleeping sickness in humans and nagana in animals, a disease marked by fever and anemia which usually ends in death.”

Discover Magazine  August 2000   “Do Parasites Rule the World?”
Leopard frogs may harbour a dozen species of parasite, including nematodes in their ears, filarial worms in their veins and flukes in their kidneys, bladder and intestines. One species of Mexican parrot carries 30 different species of mites on its feathers alone. Often the parasites themselves have parasites of their own.

Ann Louise Gittleman  “Guess What Came to Dinner?”
“Pets are host to numerous parasites and are unexpected spreaders of disease.   There are 240 infectious diseases transmitted by animals to humans.  Of these 65 are transmitted by dogs and 39 by cats.  One pet food manufacturer in America says that 89 percent of household cats sleep with their owners.  “Dog and car roundworm, hookworm and cat-transmitted toxoplasmosis can become severe in pregnant women and children and even life threatening in immunocompromised individuals”  Phillip Gosciensk, M.D. Head of the Infectious Disease Branch of Pediatrics at the Naval Regional Medical Center, finds it remarkable that these diseases are almost always unsuspected and unrecognized.“

Carl Zimmer  “Parasite Rex”
“Animals will sometimes defend themselves against parasites with a change of diet.  Some will just stop eating.  If a sheep is hit by a bad dose of intestinal worms, for instance, it may graze only a third of its normal intake.”

“Some animals under attack by parasites will start eating foods they almost never eat. Some species of wooly bears for example normally eat lupine.   When attacked by parasitic flies that lay eggs in their bodies, the woolly bears increase their chance of survival by changing from a diet of lupine to one of poison hemlock. The parasitic flies still crawl out of their bodies, but some chemical in the hemlock helps the woolly bears stay alive and grow to adulthood.  The woolly bears in other words have evolved a simple kind of medicine.”

“Sick chimps will sometimes swallow certain kinds of leaves whole; they will strip the bark of other plants and eat the bitter pith inside.  The plants have almost no nutrition in them, but they have another value.  The leaves seem to be able to clear out worms from the intestines, and the bitter pith is used as a medicine by the people who share the forest with the chimps. When scientists have analyzed the plants in laboratories, they’ve discovered that they can kill many parasites.”

With thanks to National Geographic, Discover Magazine, Ann Louise Gittleman and Carl Zimmer

I use diatomaceous earth for parasite control in my pets.

postheadericon How to Dust Your Furniture to Control Bed Bugs and Fleas Using Diatomaceous Earth

Here is a short video that shows how to dust your furniture to control bed bugs using diatomaceous earth

I buy my diatomaceous earth from Earth Works Health

postheadericon Life Cycle of a Flea

         This information is from A PDF from DirtWorks

•Fleas pass through a complete life cycle of four stages.

 

•The flea population is typically made up of 50% eggs,

•30% larvae, 15% pupae  and only 5% biting adults.

            • Completion of the life cycle from egg to adult varies from two weeks to eight months.

 

•Normally the female flea lays about 15 to 20 eggs per day up to 600 in a lifetime.

 

•Usual hosts for fleas are dogs, cats, rats, rabbits, mice, squirrels, chipmunks, raccoons, opossums, foxes, chickens, and humans.

 

            •Eggs loosely laid in the hair or fur, drop out where the pet rests, sleeps or nests (rugs, carpets, upholstered furniture, cat or dog boxes, kennels, sand boxes, etc.)

 

            •Eggs hatch in two days to two weeks into larvae found indoors in floor cracks & crevices, along baseboards, under rug edges and in furniture or beds.

 

•Sand and gravel are very suitable for flea development which is the reason fleas are erroneously called “sand fleas.”

•Using lattice or other physical boundaries can seal off these areas but, you may need to provide a substitute area for the animals to hang out in because, under the porch or shed is a nice cool place to spend time if you’re a dog or cat on a hot day.

            •Outdoor development occurs in sandy gravel soils (moist sand boxes, dirt crawl space under the house, under shrubs, etc.) where the pet may rest or sleep.

 

            •Larvae are blind, avoid light, pass through three larval stages and take a week to several months to develop.

 

            •Their food consists of digested blood from adult flea feces, dead skin, hair, feathers, and other organic debris. (Larvae do not suck blood.)

 

            •Pupa mature to adulthood within a silken cocoon woven by the larva to which pet hair, carpet fiber, dust, grass cuttings, and other debris adheres.

 

•In about five to fourteen days, adult fleas can emerge or may remain resting in the cocoon until the detection of vibration (pet and people movement), pressure (host animal lying down on them), heat, noise, or carbon dioxide (meaning a potential blood source is near).

 

•Most fleas survive the winter in the larval or pupa stage and grow best during warm, moist winters and spring.

•Adult fleas cannot survive or lay eggs without a blood meal, but may hibernate from two months to one year without feeding.

 

           

One big surprise people get is when they return from vacation and they find themselves with a major flea problem in the house. 

   There is often a desperate need for flea control after a family has returned from a long vacation. The house has been empty with no cat or dog around for fleas to feed on. When the family and pets are gone, flea eggs hatch and larvae pupate. The adult fleas fully developed inside the pupa cocoon remains in a kind of “limbo” for a long time until a blood source is near. The family returning from vacation is immediately attacked by waiting hungry hordes of fleas. (In just 30 days, 10 female fleas under ideal conditions can multiply to over a quarter million different life stages.)

 

•Completely developed adult fleas can live for several months without eating, as long as they do not emerge from their cocoons.

            •Newly emerged adult fleas live only about one week if a blood meal is not obtained.

 

•Optimum temperatures for the flea’s life cycle are 70°F to 85°F and optimum humidity is 70 percent.

 

 

For a complete, nontoxic treatment that will protect you and your pets and livestock from fleas and ticks over the long term, use Perma-Guard Diatomaceous Earth.  It kills fleas mechanically, so the pests can’t become immune to it, like they have become immune to most of the synthetic chemical treatments you get at the vet or pet store.  The pure form of Diatomaceous Earth is Fossil Shell flour.  It’s safe enough to eat and is used to treat silos for the storage of grain used in the food we all eat.

postheadericon I Use Perma-Guard Diatomaceous Earth

Perma-Guard Diatomaceous Earth (DE) is EPA approved and registered for use against indoor and outdoor crawling insects, including cockroaches, ants, bedbugs, fleas, boxelder bugs, carpet beetles, centipedes, crickets, earwigs, grasshoppers, ticks, millipedes, scorpions, slugs, and silverfish. For use in Cracks, Crevices, Hiding and Running Areas, Under and Behind Appliances, and Wall and Floor Surfaces. For use in and around homes, office buildings, restaurants, motels, warehouses, theaters, schools, hotels, and food handling establishments.

DE is odorless and nontoxic.

Indoor and Outdoor Application: Sprinkle a light layer of DE in areas where pests frequent, including under stoves, cabinets, sinks, garbage cans, window and door frames and sills, entrance ways, sewer pipes and drains, and in cracks and crevices. Repeat treatment as needed.
For Carpet Beetles: Thoroughly dust along baseboards, carpet edges, under furniture, carpet, and rugs, and in closets and shelving.
For Bedbugs: Take apart bed and dust joints and channels. Dust any hollow tubing and the interior framework as well as the mattress and all cracks in the room.
For Fleas: Thoroughly dust carpets and pet’s bedding and sleeping areas, as well as cracks and baseboards. It also can be rubbed into your pet’s fur.
For Flies: Thoroughly dust areas where flies frequent (walls, straw bedding, livestock pens). It also can be applied to livestock coat as an insect repellent/contact insecticide.

DE is composed of finely milled fossilized shells of minuscule organisms called diatoms. The microscopically fine, sharp edges desiccate the insects’ exoskeleton upon contact and the pests dehydrate and die within hours. The insects also die when they eat the dust.

postheadericon Food Grade Diatomaceous earth

Food Grade Diatomaceous Earth

Perma-Guard Organic Diatomaceous Earth
Mined from the purest of deposits from prehistoric freshwater lake beds,
Food Grade Diatomaceous Earth consists of finely milled silica shells of
ancient microscopic freshwater plants called diatoms. Of 600 deposits in
the U.S., only 4 rate in purity by FDA standards to label as “Food Grade”.

There is no clay in our product.

Examples of Food Grade Diatomaceous Earth Uses for Pets & People:
Flea control, human health benefits, organic pest control, bed bugs,
pet food health supplement, cat litter odor control and whiter teeth!
Don’t Forget our Best Friends – Dogs, Cats, Birds, Rabbits..
They need DE for Fleas, Ticks, Ear Mites..even worming
and as a health supplement to add to their pet food.
Please see our “Critters” page.

Food Grade Diatomaceous Earth is a mainstay for organic pest control on farms.
DE is used heavily by organic farms partly because of its organic nature, but DE is also used
by non-organic growers for pest control because DE (Fossil Shell Flour) is so effective,
and garden insects never become immune. DE kills bugs physically, not chemically.

Farms and Ranches use Food Grade Diatomaceous Earth as a feed supplement for animals and livestock for better health. DE is also recommended by veterinarians as a health supplement when added daily to pet food, and as a topical flea control treatment. Food Grade DE can also be found in food that is eaten by most people every day, as DE is widely used and FDA approved for use by the nation’s farms in agricultural grain storage.

This brings us to one of the most exciting trends … Increased use of Food Grade Diatomaceous Earth for human health benefits. Because of FDA control and oversight of labeling, many wonderful natural, herbal or organic supplements will seldom if ever claim to be treatments or remedies for specific maladies. This is also true of Food Grade DE.

Within this site, you can learn about DE as an effective bed bug remedy and also of the many  everyday household uses for this remarkable substance. Every home should have it.

To Read FAQ’s about Diatomaceous Earth Click Here

REQUIRED FDA DISCLAIMER: Content on this site is for reference purposes only, based on reviews from users of food grade diatomaceous earth. It is not intended to substitute for advice given by a physician, pharmacist, or other licensed healthcare professional. User statements regarding DE as dietary supplement have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration and are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease or health condition. Those with health problems, pregnancy or who are nursing are specifically advised that they should consult their physician before taking any nutritional supplement.
* Any food grade DE uses discussed on this site other than those approved by the EPA, FDA, or USDA are strictly anicdotal reports of what countless numbers of users as well as we ourselves have experienced using diatomaceous earth

ABOUT EPA LABELS: All of the Food Grade DE that we sell is exactly the same product on the inside, but there is a very important difference in the labeling. Because DE kills insects, only when used for that purpose, it falls under EPA regulatory control. All of the claims that we make on this site about killing insects can only be made on food grade DE with the EPA label on it. We sell the EPA labeled product in 5 and 50 lb. bags. We also sell the NON-EPA labled 50 lb. bag. Most of our packaging reflects general use, and therefore has no EPA label on it. If you purchase the non-EPA labeled product, you acknowledge that you are buying the diatomaceous earth for some other purpose than for killing insects.

postheadericon A Bed Bug Feeding

I found this short video about a bed bug feeding on an arm. It made me itch all over. To think that many homes are infested with these nasty bugs. People as well as pets sleep in beds that are loaded with them.

Tell me your able to watch this and NOT itch TOO!
You can order your diatomaceous earth HERE to kill these nasty bugs safely, using an all natural product that is indeed good for everyone and everything.

postheadericon Perma-Guard™ Supplies Earth Works Health With Their DE

Perma-Guard™, Inc. is the original and largest supplier of fresh water, food grade Diatomaceous Earth products for agricultural use in the world.

Perma-Guard™, is the company known world wide for using a grade and quality of Diatomaceous Earth (DE) that is extremely pure.

Perma-Guard™ supplies EarthWorksHealth with the DE that they sell.

Please note that Fossil Shell Flour® is almost white or slightly gray in color. We believe it to be the best quality available. 

DE Diatomaceous Earth

 

Perma-Guard™ is the original and largest supplier of fresh water, food grade Diatomaceous Earth products for agricultural use in the world.

What is Diatomaceous Earth

Perma-Guard, with more than 40 years of experience, is the company known world wide for using a grade and quality of Diatomaceous Earth that is extremely pure. It was important to have a consistent shape diatom and no unwanted sediment. The shape of the diatom must be tubular with holes on the walls. It must be fresh water because the diatoms form a harder shell and is less fragile that those in salt water. Salt water deposits contain a mix of diatom species. These deposits shapes and sediments are inconsistent making them unusable for our products.

DE Diatomaceous EarthOut of 600 deposits in the US only 4 are considered “Food Grade” by the FDA standards. Other food grade deposits may contain higher amounts of sediment and clay that make them less effective. Depending upon how the deposits were formed, clay particles may be present in sufficient quantities to clog the pores of the fossilized shells. If this is the case, the effectiveness of the Diatomaceous Earth is severely reduced. We have analysis of many other “Food Grade” deposits and are satisfied that we still obtain the Diatomaceous Earth for our products from the purest fresh water source.

Perma-Guard products use Diatomaceous Earth, mother natures eco-friendly naturally organic material. Our products fit into the “Living Green” lifestyle. Actually, Diatomaceous Earth is not an earth. It is the fossilized remains of microscopic shells created by one celled plants called DIATOMS. Not all deposits of Diatomaceous Earth diatoms present in those deposits are the same. Perma-Guard’s FOSSIL SHELL FLOUR® is a very pure form of Diatomaceous Earth used as an anti-caking feed additive.