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Archive for the ‘Parasites’ Category

postheadericon Does your dog need to be groomed?

Does your dog need to be groomed?… May I suggest that ALL dogs needs to be groomed, some just more than others. Grooming your dog should not be a chore or a task that you dread doing. Spending time grooming your furry friend should be something that you both look forward to.

Grooming is an essential part of owning a dog. Along with regular walks and balanced meals, it is vital to the health and well being of your dog and thus is a process that all owners should be aware of today. No matter what breed of dog you have, your knowledge of grooming or your experience in looking after dogs, it is important to know something about how to groom your dog.

We all have busy lives and would probably like to learn the best ways to quickly groom your dog without wasting time or money.

I have several dogs…. one of my dogs in particular loves to be groomed… if I were to be completely honest…. I am not sure she really likes to be groomed as much as she loves the attention that she gets when she is being groomed. All of my attention is on her and she loves it. Daisy is indeed her mama’s girl.

My Daisy has the most beautiful fur coat. I use a rake on her and also a shedding blade. She loves the shedding blade. Daisy is a Labadoddle…. I don’t have to get her hair cut but many dogs do need to have regular hair cuts. Learning to groom your own dog is really not that hard if you have a bit of guidance.

You can shop for your dog grooming tools in your local area or you can shop online for them where I buy many things for my pets Entirely Pets. They have just about anything your looking for all sorts of pets.. not just dogs. One year for Christmas I bought everyone in my family a Furminator… from Entirely Pets….That really is a marvelous MUST HAVE tool for your dogs and cats as well.

I have found a wonderful guide about dog grooming.

Here’s just a small sample of what you will discover in the Secrets to Easy Dog Grooming.

Discover how to choose the right GROOMING TOOLS that make all the difference!
Learn the right and the wrong way to brush your dog (you might be surprised).
Discover the easy & safe way to brush your dog’s teeth.
Secrets to choosing a genuine professional dog groomer.
Find out the secrets to removing those tear stains below your dog’s eyes and mouth.
Discover how to easily cut and shape your dog’s coat..
How to manage hair MATTING and hair SHEDDING.
Uncover common grooming problems and how to manage them.
Learn the proven tips to cut down on the overall cost of grooming.
Learn how to make the most of your grooming tools.
Discover the 3 BEST ways to ensure a shiny healthy coat.
Learn how to safely & easily clip your dog’s nails.
Finally discover how to eliminate that “DOGGY SMELL” associated with some dog breeds.
Discover the different varieties of SHAMPOOS you can choose from and which one is best for your doggy!
How to effectively empty your dog’s anal glands.
How to quickly manage the aggressive or biting dog while grooming.
Learn what SKIN PROBLEMS may be aggravated during grooming and how to prevent or manage them!
The easy method to plucking your dogs ears with minimal discomfort.
Discover how often to bath your dog without causing dry itchy skin.
TEETH BRUSHING – The easiest way to quickly brush your dog’s teeth.
Discover how to simply TRIM YOUR DOG’S NAILS plus what to do if you accidentally trim too much and they begin to bleed.
How to ensure you feed the correct nutrients for a well balanced diet that will help ensure your dog has a healthy coat and skin.
Learn why you need to have a first aid kit handy when grooming and what it MUST include!

In addition to feeding my dogs diatomaceous earth… I also enjoy keeping them looking great by taking care of their coats with proper grooming. It is a great way to spend one on one time with your furry friend. I can highly recommend both DE and the gre4at dog grooming book I found. The Secrets to Easy Dog Grooming

postheadericon How to Apply Diatomaceous Earth to Your Pet

I have found a great short video done by the Green Tip Guy showing how to apply diatomaceous earth to your dog. I thought that you might enjoy watching how easy it really is… This is the exact method that I use…… and he is right my dogs love it TOO!

I buy my Food Grade Diatomaceous Earth from EarthWorksHealth.

postheadericon Getting Rid of Head Lice

I received a question on my Facebook Page from someone who’s daughter was getting head lice at school.
This is the question and what I replied back to her.

My daughter keeps getting head lice from school. Do you think rubbing DE in her scalp might get rid of them? And would it be safe? Thanks

You bet… diatomaceous.net/flying-and-crawling-bugs/ There is a bit about it on that page… Cover your daughters eyes and nose area with a moist washcloth.I would sprinkle DE on dry hair you may even want to rub it so it gets down onto the scalp…. using a fine tooth comb… comb it also … your goal is to get it on all of the hair strands. Cover with a shower cap or wrap securely with a towel and leave on all night. In the morning shampoo the DE out of the hair and use that fine tooth comb again. Rinse with a solution of 1 cup vinegar and 2 Tablespoons of water…. don’t get that in the eyes.
DE is very drying so make sure you use a conditioner after you have used the shampoo.
If there is itching or irritation remove the DE with shampoo and apply a conditioner.
Your hands will be dry after applying DE so wash them good, you may want to apply a lotion to your hands as well.

Treat everyone and everything at the same time…. other wise they will still be there. You may have to repeat this treatment a few times to make sure that you have gotten all of the eggs as well as the lice.
Please keep us posted on how this works out for you.

postheadericon Bed Bug Interceptor For Your Bed

While you are using Diatomaceous Earth to rid your home of bed bugs (It can take a week or more to get them all), you need to protect your bed so they can not crawl up and bite you. Remember, bed bugs can not fly, so if you remove all bed skirting and pull the bed away from the wall, the only way the bed bugs can get to you is crawling up the bed legs. Put one of these bed bug interceptors under each leg of your bed, and you are protected!!

Note: Order 1 for each leg of the beds you want to protect. Most beds will need 4 or 6.

You can get these handy interceptors at the same place you get the DE. Earth Works Health

postheadericon DIATOMACEOUS EARTH: A Non Toxic Pesticide

I have found a wonderful article about diatomaceous earth written by by Professor Stuart B. Hill from the Department of Entomology and Ecological Agriculture Projects.

Professor Hill writes about using DE for grain storage and using it in the home as a non toxic pesticide and also for use in animal production units for the control of external parasites and flies.

You can read the entire article for yourself HERE…eap.mcgill.ca/publications/eap4.htm

postheadericon Why does diatomaceous earth NOT kill the good bacteria in the gut?

I got a very interesting question the other day on my Facebook Page The question was….why doesn’t diatomaceous earth kill the beneficial bacteria in the gut.

The statement “DE does NOT kill the beneficial bacteria in the gut” can be found on many websites. But finding out the “WHY” does it NOT also kill the good bacteria took a bit of digging.

I found the answer by reading many different website and articles and I ending up submitting a different search term to Google with the information that I found. (What did we do before the internet… Thank You Al Gore) I put in the search box… “does bad bacteria have a negative or a positive charge” ?

I found my answer…….

Diatomaceous Earth will not absorb beneficial bacteria simply due to the fact that DE has a negative charge and bad bacteria has a positive charge. DE will attract and absorb the bad bacteria, viruses, fungi, etc without harming anything good or beneficial.

Before I had found the answer by myself I had sent off this “WHY” question in an email to a friend of mine, Tui Rose who wrote a wonderful book, The Diatomaceous Earth Book “Going Green Using Diatomaceous Earth How-To Tips”. It contains a wealth of information. This was her reply to me…

I did not address that issue in my Going Green DE book although I had heard the same answer you found. The angle of negative and positive polarity is true. I’ve not seen any other answer, but in my next book I am going to place this answer along with the daily supplementation of probiotics. If the body is depleted of good bacteria for any one of many reasons including the use of antibiotics DE does not replace probiotics, so it is still wise to use probiotics anyway.

My next book on DE will include a chapter on Human Ingestion. Should be available in 3-4 months

I for one can hardly wait for this book…. I have so many people asking for more information about the health benefits of using DE.. and being a registered nurse I am certain that Tui Rose will have the information thoroughly researched.

I found this video on a site called Silalive.. It is not very long, and I have not ever heard anyone pronouns diatomaceous earth quite like she does…. It contains great information and sort of addresses the original question that was ask about the “WHY”

postheadericon Poultry Science Study About Effect of Using Diatomaceous Earth

An very extensive study was submitted to Poultry Science. The study was entitled “Effect of diatomaceous earth on parasite load, egg production, and egg quality of free-range organic laying hens” by D. C. Bennett1, A. Yee2, Y.-J. Rhee3 and K. M. Cheng

I will be the very first to admit I am not much for reading this stuff in it’s entity… and I will admit my eyes glazed over at times with some of the information that was presented.. BUT… this study documents the importance of using diatomaceous earth around poultry. Even though I skipped a few parts of this information, I am sure it would mean a great deal to many. I was still able to grasps what a wonderful benefit adding DE to the keeping of poultry is.

This is the starting lines of the study…

The effectiveness of diatomaceous earth (DE) as a treatment against parasites and to increase feed efficiency and egg production of organically raised free-range layer hens was evaluated in 2 breeds of commercial egg layers [Bovan Brown (BB) and Lowmann Brown (LB)] that differ in their resistance to internal parasitic infections. Half the hens of each breed were…
You can read the entire post from the PDF here. PoultryScienceRLEStudy

postheadericon Studies Done About Diatomaceous Earth by Red Lake Earth

I love chickens. They are such fun to have around. I have been reading a lot about adding diatomaceous earth (DE) to their feed and also letting them enjoy it as a dust bath will make for much “Happier Chickens.”

Happy Chickens means better looking chickens, more eggs production, just all around healthier/Happy Chickens.  Red Lake Earth did several studies about the benefits of adding DE to chicken feed. The results of the study was very interesting, in fact after reading the studies I would hope that everyone who raises any number of chickens from 1 to a zillion should be adding this wonderful, all natural product that is indeed good for every one and every thing.

The first study I would like to post was done by….

RED LAKE EARTH ……Effect on Bone Mineralization

Previously we showed that free-range hens fed diets supplemented with diatomaceous earth (DE) were significantly heavier, laid more eggs, and consumed more feed than hens fed the control diet, with no differences in feed efficiency. In the present study….. you can read the entire study here.
www.absorbentproductsltd.com/Red-Lake-Diatomaceous-Earth-Bone-Mineralization-Study.pdf

Red Lake Earth did another study called Effect of Dietary Diatomaceous Earth and a Single Topical Application of llarn Fresh on House Fly, Musca domestica L., Breeding, Egg Quality and Selected Manure Nutrients. Now that is quite the title for a subject but the jest of the whole thing is…… Using DE on the chickens and around the their living quarters cuts down on flies…. amongst other interesting findings. Your able to read the entire study here.
www.absorbentproductsltd.com/Red-Lake-Diatomaceous-Earth-House-Fly-and-Egg-Quality-Study.pdf

I found both of these studies very interesting and they contain documented proof that using diatomaceous earth is indeed very beneficial.

postheadericon That is Not Tumor, It’s a Brain Worm

 Lauren Cox from ABC News Medical Unit has posted another wonderful in-depth story. This time about a parasitic worm eating Rosemary Alvarez’s brain. Yes you read that right… eating her brain. Can you imagine anything as gross and disgusting as that?  Many more people that you would think have worms/parasites. This is one woman’s story and it is extremely well written:

By LAUREN COX

ABC News Medical Unit
Nov. 24, 2008
 

Late last summer, Rosemary Alvarez of Phoenix thought she had a brain tumor. But on the operating table her doctor discovered something even more unsightly — a parasitic worm eating her brain.

Alvarez, 37, was first referred to the Barrow Neurological Institute at St. Joseph’s Hospital and Medical Center in Phoenix with balance problems, difficulty swallowing and numbness in her left arm.

An MRI scan revealed a foreign growth at her brain stem that looked just like a brain tumor to Dr. Peter Nakaji, a neurosurgeon at the Barrow Neurological Institute.

“Ones like this that are down in the brain stem are hard to pick out,” said Nakaji. “And she was deteriorating rather quickly, so she needed it out.”

Yet at a key moment during the operation to remove the fingernail-sized tumor, Nakaji, instead, found a parasite living in her brain, a tapeworm called Taenia solium, to be precise.

“I was actually quite pleased,” said Nakaji. “As neurosurgeons, we see a lot of bad things and have to deliver a lot of bad news.”

When Alvarez awoke, she heard the good news that she was tumor-free and she would make a full recovery. But she also heard the disturbing news of how the worm got there in the first place.

Nakaji said someone, somewhere, had served her food that was tainted with the feces of a person infected with the pork tapeworm parasite.

“It wasn’t that she had poor hygiene, she was just a victim,” said Nakaji.

 

Pork Tapeworms a Small, But Growing Trend

“We’ve got a lot more of cases of this in the United States now,” said Raymond Kuhn, professor of biology and an expert on parasites at Wake Forest University in Winston-Salem, N.C. “Upwards of 20 percent of neurology offices in California have seen it.”

The pork tapeworm has plagued people for thousands of years. The parasite, known as cysticercosis, lives in pork tissue, and is likely the reason why Jewish and Muslim dietary laws ban pork.

Kuhn said whether you get a tapeworm in the intestine, or a worm burrowing into your brain can depend on how you consumed the parasite.

 

 

How Humans Get Worms

Eat the parasite in tainted meat and you’ll end up eating the larvae, called cysts. Kuhn said in that case, a person can only end up with a tapeworm.

“You can eat cysts all day long and it won’t get into your brain,” said Kuhn. Instead, the larvae go through the stomach and mature in the intestine.

“When it gets down into their small intestine, it latches on, and then it starts growing like an alien,” said Kuhn.

Once there, the tapeworm starts feeding and gets to work. A single tapeworm will release 50,000 eggs a day, most of which usually end up in the toilet.

“They can see these little packets pass in their feces,” said Kuhn. “And … sometimes people eat the eggs from feces by accident.”

Kuhn said it is then feces-tainted food, and not undercooked pork, that leads to worms burrowing into the brain.

Unlike the cysts, the eggs are able to pass from the stomach into the bloodstream. From there, the eggs may travel and lodge in various parts of the body — including the muscle, the brain or under the skin — before maturing into cysts themselves.

According to Kuhn, who has traveled to study this parasite, cysticercosis is a big problem in some parts of Latin America and Mexico where health codes are hard to enforce and people may frequently eat undercooked pork.

As people travel across the border with Mexico for vacation and work, Kuhn said so does the tapeworm. One person infected with a parasite, who also has bad hand washing habits, can infect many others with eggs.

“These eggs can live for three months in formaldehyde,” said Kuhn. “You got to think, sometimes, a person is slapping lettuce on your sandwich with a few extra add-ons there.”

 

Getting the Worms Out

Dr. Christopher Madden, an assistant professor in the University of Texas Southwestern department of neurological surgery in Dallas, has operated on a number of these cysts himself. He said not every worm needs to be surgically removed; those whose location is not an immediate threat to the patient’s health can be treated with medications that cause the worms to die.

But when the cysts are in problematic locations, as was the case for Alvarez, an operation is necessary. Fortunately, the long-term prognosis for most patients is positive.

“Most patients we see actually do very well with medicines and/or surgery to take out a large cyst,” Madden said.

Alvarez is not alone in accidentally eating tainted food, but Nakaji rarely sees cases so severe that people require surgery. Nakaji said he only removed six or seven worms in neurosurgery this year.

“But lodging in the brain stem is bad luck,” he said.

Nakaji said other parts of the brain have more “room” or tissue to expand around a growing cyst. However the brain stem, which is crucial to life, is only the width of a finger or two.

“She could have recovered,” said Nakaji. “But if the compression lasted for long enough, she could have been left permanently disabled or dead.”

Link back to original post here  abcnews.go.com/Health/PainManagement/story?id=6309464&page=1

postheadericon Diseases Transmitted From Animals Are Called Zoonotic

A boy and his dog
Zoonotic.. kind of a catchy name but it is the name that has been given to diseases that are transmitted from animals. I guess that is where the “ZOO” in Zoonotic comes from. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has posted an article about Zoonotic you can read it below.

Pets can carry parasites and pass parasites to people. Proper hand washing can greatly reduce risk.

Diseases transmitted from animals are called zoonotic diseases. Zoonotic diseases can be caused by parasites and can cause various symptoms such as diarrhea, muscle aches, and fever. Sometimes infected persons experience severe symptoms that can be life-threatening.

Foods can be contaminated if animals such as cows and pigs are infected with parasites such as Cryptosporidium and Trichinella. People can acquire trichinellosis by ingesting Trichinella-infected, undercooked meat such as bear, boar, or domestic pigs. Cryptosporidiosis can be acquired by people if orchards or water sources near cow pastures become contaminated from infected cows and people consume the fruit without proper washing.

Pets can carry and pass parasites to people but with proper hand washing the risk is greatly reduced.

Some dog and cat parasites can infect people. Young animals, such as puppies and kittens, are more likely to be infected with ascarids and hookworms. Contact with wild animals or places where wild animals have been can expose people to parasites. For example, people can be infected by the raccoon parasite Baylisascaris when they handle soil that is contaminated with infected raccoon feces.

A girl and her catRegular veterinary care will protect your pet and your family.

There are simple steps you can take to prevent common parasite infections from animals. Making sure your pet is under a veterinarian’s care will help protect your pet and your family from possible parasite infections. Washing hands frequently, especially after touching animals, and avoiding contact with animal feces can also help prevent infections. Following proper food-handling procedures will reduce the risk of transmission from contaminated food. People with compromised immune systems should be especially aware of contact with animals that could transmit these infections.

Link  back to original post.   www.cdc.gov/parasites/animals.html